bahrain injustice

 
 

Bahrain Kingdom of Injustice 22 new Political Prisoners to its list of detained on false charges

Bahrain regime imprisons 22 Shiite over anti-regime protests
17 August, 2014 – PRessTV

The Bahraini regime has given jail terms to 22 activists for taking part in pro-democracy demonstrations in the Persian Gulf country.

The Bahraini regime has given jail terms to 22 activists for taking part in pro-democracy demonstrations in the Persian Gulf country.

On Saturday, a Bahraini court sentenced 18 citizens to three years and four others to two years in prison for partaking in protests in Bani Jamra, a village in the northwest of Bahrain.

On Friday, thousands of people staged an anti-regime protest in the village of Diraz on the country’s northwestern coast to voice solidarity with journalists and photographers arrested by the Al Khalifa regime’s crackdown.

A separate demonstration was held in the village of Sanabis, located in the suburbs of the Bahraini capital Manama.

Since mid-February 2011, thousands of pro-democracy protesters have held numerous demonstrations in the streets of Bahrain, calling for the Al Khalifa royal family to relinquish power.

On March 14, 2011, troops from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates invaded the country to assist the Bahraini government in its crackdown on peaceful protesters.

According to local sources, scores of people have been killed and hundreds arrested.

On June 10, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) censured the Manama regime for human rights violations in the country. A total of 46 members of the international body expressed deep concern over the Al Khalifa regime’s crackdown on peaceful protesters. …more


US Protesters could learn much about their government's injustice by noticing Bahrain

They Can’t Outlaw the Revolution
by Chris Hedges – commondreams.org – 19 May, 2014

Cecily McMillan. (Photo by Lucy Parks CC-BY)RIKERS ISLAND, N.Y.—Cecily McMillan, the Occupy activist who on Monday morning will appear before a criminal court in New York City to be sentenced to up to seven years on a charge of assaulting a police officer, sat in a plastic chair wearing a baggy, oversized gray jumpsuit, cheap brown plastic sandals and horn-rim glasses. Other women, also dressed in prison-issued gray jumpsuits, sat nearby in the narrow, concrete-walled visitation room clutching their children, tears streaming down their faces. The children, bewildered, had their arms wrapped tightly around their mothers’ necks. It looked like the disaster scene it was.

“It’s all out in the open here,” said the 25-year-old student, who was to have graduated May 22 with a master’s degree from The New School of Social Research in New York City. “The cruelty of power can’t hide like it does on the outside. You get America, everything America has become, especially for poor people of color in prison. My lawyers think I will get two years. But two years is nothing compared to what these women, who never went to trial, never had the possibility of a trial with adequate legal representation, face. There are women in my dorm who, because they have such a poor command of English, do not even understand their charges. I spent a lot of time trying to explain the charges to them.”

McMillan says Grantley Bovell, who was in plainclothes and did not identify himself as a police officer, grabbed her from behind during a March 17, 2012, gathering of several hundred Occupy activists in Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park. In a video of the incident she appears to have instinctively elbowed him in the face, but she says she has no memory of what happened. Video and photographs—mostly not permitted by the trial judge to be shown in the courtroom—buttressed her version of events. There is no dispute that she was severely beaten by police and taken from the park to a hospital where she was handcuffed to a bed. On May 5 she was found guilty after a three-week trial of a felony assault in the second degree. She can receive anything from probation to seven years in prison.

“I am prepared mentally for a long sentence,” she told me this past weekend when I interviewed her at the Rikers Island prison in the Bronx. “I watched the trial. I watched the judge. This was never about justice. Just as it is not about justice for these other women. One mother was put in here for shoplifting after she lost her job and her house and needed to feed her children. There is another prisoner, a preschool teacher with a 1-year-old son she was breastfeeding, who let her cousin stay with her after her cousin was evicted. It turns out the cousin sold drugs. The cops found money, not drugs, that the cousin kept in the house and took the mother. They told her to leave her child with the neighbors. There is story after story in here like this. It wakes you up.”

McMillan’s case is emblematic of the nationwide judicial persecution of activists, a persecution familiar to poor people of color. Her case stands in contrast with the blanket impunity given to the criminals of Wall Street. Some 8,000 nonviolent Occupy protesters have been arrested. Not one banker or investor has gone to jail for causing the 2008 financial meltdown. The disparity of justice mirrors the disparity in incomes and the disparity in power.

Occupy activists across the country have been pressured to “plea out” on felony charges in exchange for sentences of years of probation, which not only carry numerous restrictions, including being unable to attend law school or serve on a jury, but make it difficult for them to engage in further activism for fear of arrest and violating their probation. McMillan was offered the same plea deal but refused it. She was one of the few who went to trial. …more


Bahrain Courts of Injustice Sentence Hussain Hubail, Jasim AlNaimi, Sadiq AlShaabani to Five Years

jailed

Hussain Hubail and Jasim AlNaimi received sentences of FIVE years today, with Sadiq AlShaabani, an actor and six activists no longer in the country. There is no pretense that these young men have actually done anything other
than attend demonstrations or sent emails.

In Hussain Hubail’s case, he will not survive with his heart condition. Please write to Jeremy Hunt, U.K. Minister of Health saying Hussain should be released on Health and Humanitarian grounds. Ask Mr Hunt to contact the Bahrain Minister of the Interior. You can contact Jeremy on: Department_of_Health@dh.gsi.gov.uk

A list of potential prisoners for release, women, kids and sick and injured has been prepared for the U.N officials who should meet the Bahrain Foreign Minister, before they leave Bahrain having completed the UNHCR project.

Regarding the Warsi statement on “no specific evidence of torture”, the Bahrainis have written to Mr Cameron and the Chairman of the House of Commons.

The Chairman said “he couldn’t talk about it” Why?

Mr Cameron said “please write to Hague”. Mr Cameron as leader of the Tories and Prime Minister should reprimand Warsi and say she must apologise. If this means a change in U.K. stance on the Khalifas’ policy of systemic torture, so be it. This issue will not fade away as most Bahrainis in London were tortured and it’s basis for their asylum application.

These are the names of all those sentenced today for 5 years:

1. Husain Hubail (in Jail)
2. Jasim Alnaimi (in Jail)
3. Sadiq Alshaabani (In Jail)
4. Husain Yousif (abroad)
5. Baqer Darwish (abroad)
6. Hasan Alsitri (abroad)
7. Yousif Al Hoori (abroad)
8. Ali Al Fayez (abroad)
9. Ahmed Almotaghawi (abroad)

حسين حبيل 5 سنوات
جاسم النعيمي 5 سنوات
صادق الشعباني 5 سنوات
حسين يوسف 5 سنوات
باقر درويش 5 سنوات
حسن الستري 5 سنوات
يوسف الحوري 5 سنوات
علي الفايز 5 سنوات
أحمد المتغوي 5 سنوات


Mohamed Abdulla Tajer, Sayed Hussain, Mohamed Oun Ali, Sayed Ali, suffer Bahrain Court of Injustice

I want to tell you about the decline in justice and the legal procedures in Bahrain, where people including children are detained, tortured, forced to sign unseen confessions and jailed for long periods. All you get from Mr Robertson and his predecessor Mr Burt, The U.K. Ministers for the Middle East and Northern Africa is their “concern” and that they talk quietly to the Khalifa regime about “due process.” There is no due process.

Mohamed Abdulla Tajer, (25) was detained on August 6th 2013. He was targeted to stop the well known defence lawyer Mohamed Tajer persueing political cases and defending “terrorists.” He was sentenced to SEVEN years today. He was charged with “attacking” the police but actually defended young ladies attacked by police on a demonstration. The accuser is an officer at the notorious Samaheej police station. The police accusations are based on secret sources and difficult for the defence lawyers to question. The police officer brought the person he claimed was the “victim” of the attack to identify Mohammed which he duly did.

The other defendants Sayed Ali, (34) Sayed Hussain (36) and Mohamed Oun Ali (26.) all got seven years. Mohamed Tajer the lawyer has tried to see his client Mohammed three times but failed. On 2nd December Mohammed denied all charges and said he was tortured to confess. The Prosecutor said he couldn’t drop all the charges against Mohammed or the fact he’d been tortured, but offered to state he’s been punched ONE TIME. After 2nd December 2013 session he was forced to sign more papers to incriminate himself to avoid further torture. He missed two court sessions because the prison bus was late and prisoners are always abused and strip searched beforehand at the prison. He never saw his lawyer before sentencing. He has been in Dry Dock Prison but will now move to Jau Prison.

Mohamed has hemorrhoids but the Prison Authorities won’t allow the operation. He only gets painkillers. When he attended Salmanya Hospital in February he was told he needed medicine, a proper diet and salt and water baths –impossible in the overcrowded, unhygienic prison where there are 5 beds for 12 men and no clean water. He is a quiet, reserved young man who works in an office, targeted to put pressure on his relative Mohamed Tajer
. Please help Mohammed by raising his case with your M.P. and Congressman. It is time the U.S. and U.K. Governments put pressure on the Khalifas to improve the legal system and prison conditions as a prelude to negotiations.


Bahrain Regime sentences expose Saudi lead strategy for egregious injustice in Egypt, Gulf States


Bahrain Ministry of Injustice launches round-up, illegal deteantion of 25 after bomb blast

Bahrain detains 25 for involvement in bomb blast
4 MArch, 2014 – PressTV

In Bahrain, 25 people have been arrested on suspicion of being involved in a deadly bomb attack targeting police forces near the country’s capital, Manama, earlier this week.

The country’s interior minister Sheik Rashid bin Abdullah Al Khalifa made the announcement during a televised address on Tuesday, March 4.

The Bahraini minister said the attack on Monday, March 3, left at least three police officers who were trying to break up crowds of anti-government protesters in Daih, dead.

He also mentioned an attack that killed a policeman last month.

Bahrain’s main opposition groups have also condemned the deadly attacks.

Manama also listed the February 14 coalition, and the al-Ashtar Brigades and the Resistance Brigades opposition groups as terrorist organizations, without further explanation.

Since mid-February 2011, thousands of pro-democracy protesters have held numerous demonstrations in the streets of Bahrain, calling for the Al Khalifa royal family to step down from power.

One month later, troops from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates invaded Bahrain to assist the Bahraini government in its crackdown on peaceful protesters.

Reports suggest scores of people have been killed and hundreds of others arrested over the past three years.

According to the Physicians for Human Rights, Bahraini doctors and nurses have been detained, tortured, or disappeared because they have “evidence of atrocities committed by the authorities, security forces, and riot police” in the crackdown on anti-government protesters. …more


Bahrain Ministry of Injustice extracts 4 bombing confessions after massive round-up, tortures

4 Bahrainis could face death penalty: Prosecutors
9 March, 2014 –

Four Bahrainis could face the death penalty over an alleged attack that killed three policemen earlier this month, prosecutors say.

On Sunday, the Bahraini prosecutors issued a statement saying the four men have “confessed” to involvement in the blast that killed the security personnel, AFP reported.

On March 3, the three policemen were killed in the bomb attack in Daih village, west of the capital Manama, Bahrain’s Interior Ministry said.

An officer from the United Arab Emirates, deployed in the Persian Gulf state, was among the dead officers.

The explosion happened as Bahraini troops attacked and fired teargas to disperse thousands of people who had gathered to mourn the death of an anti-regime activist in the village.

Since mid-February 2011, thousands of pro-democracy protesters have held numerous demonstrations in the streets of Bahrain, calling for the Al Khalifa royal family to relinquish power.

On March 14, 2011, troops from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates invaded the country to assist the Bahraini government in its crackdown on peaceful protesters.

According to local sources, scores of people have been killed and hundreds arrested.

Physicians for Human Rights says doctors and nurses have been detained, tortured, or disappeared because they have “evidence of atrocities committed by the authorities, security forces, and riot police” in the crackdown on anti-government protesters.

On March 3, 2014, three policemen were killed in the bomb attack in Daih village, west of the capital Manama, Bahrain’s Interior Ministry said. An officer from the United Arab Emirates, deployed in the Persian Gulf state, was among the dead. The explosion happened as Bahraini troops attacked and fired teargas to disperse thousands of people who had gathered to mourn the death of an anti-regime activist in the village.

Since mid-February 2011, thousands of pro-democracy protesters have held numerous demonstrations in the streets of Bahrain, calling for the Al Khalifa royal family to relinquish power. On March 14, 2011, troops from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates invaded the country to assist the Bahraini government in its crackdown on peaceful protesters. According to local sources, scores of people have been killed and hundreds arrested. Physicians for Human Rights says doctors and nurses have been detained, tortured, or disappeared because they have “evidence of atrocities committed by the authorities, security forces, and riot police” in the crackdown on anti-government protesters.” target=”_blank”>…more


Bahrain Courts of Injustice the Ultimate Charade of Hamad's House of Fools

injusticelaw

Statement by Bahrain Human Rights Observatory (BHRO)

Bahrain Human Rights Observatory (BHRO) regrets the insults and the inappropriate treatment to which the lawyers are being exposed before the criminal courts by some members of court panels, which has reached levels that necessitate a strong stance by the Supreme Judiciary Council to restore the lawyers confidence in the judiciary System.

Many lawyers were thrown out of court halls. Among whom were lawyer Abdulla Zain ulddin, lawyer Mohsin Al-Alawi. Many were also insulted and stopped by policemen who outnumber judges and litigants in criminal courts.

Lawyers who are attempting to perform their duties and enter some courts are impeded by police through placing blocks that prevent movement from one court to another, or by locking the court doors after the judge enters, regardless of the fact that lawyers may go back and forth to the same court for more than an hour waiting for sessions to be held. What is worst is that lawyers are being constantly stopped and impeded by policemen when they move between various court halls. Police men go as far as using force to deny lawyers access to courts and even interfere to evict them from courts.

Most of lawyers in criminal courts has reached a high degree of desperation because they are unable to provide the minimum levels of defense guarantees and fair trials, especially as police and public prosecution are not allowing them to attend interrogations of political prisoners, and judges are refusing any serious defense or even listening to the prisoners, checking torture marks or even talking about torture or investigating it. Lawyers do not see any real desire on the part of judges to listen to their request, thereby rendering their job in defending prisoners in political cases to become a mere make – believe defense and a psychological support for the prisoners. Cases in which the accused are opposition supporters take several days or months before a verdict is issued.

It has also been noticed recently that various courts have reached a level that they openly protect prosecution witnesses (mainly policemen) against questioning by lawyers, and exceeding that, to answering for them or refraining from putting any questions to them. Lawyers have even learnt that prosecution witnesses are being allowed access to case files before being questioned thereby rendering the questioning of any security officer futile. This has created a conviction among lawyers that some judges have developed a negative attitude towards all political prisoners, and trials are being held hastily without complying with the simplest rules and articles of the Criminal Procedures Law, such as formally charging the accused, interrogating, allowing for their examination by a forensic doctor, interrogation of prosecution witnesses or displaying or examining the evidence or even listening to denial witnesses. Even written defense may not be submitted. It has been noticed that many political cases have been held for verdict without presentation of witnesses or written defense.
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